CBT in Job Centres: Five Objections

CBT in Job Centres: Five Objections

Great, spend money on mental health therapy on people who don’t need it as much and stop their benefits if they refuse. So save money by cutting job number (it may well help some people get jobs) save money by not paying those who refuse the “training” and look like your spending money on mental health which will never get used by those who need it most

The Psychiatry SHO*

In March, Nick Clegg announced his plan to improve access to mental health care for people who are out of work. It started off so well, but had a bizarre twist.

He said that he’d found an extra £25 million for mental health, to be invested over the next three years. So far so good.

And that this money might end up helping 40,000 people. Great.

And that this money would fund ‘specialists in mental health support’ to provide talking therapy in 350 Job Centres across the UK. Sorry, what?

On the face of it, you might mistake this for a good idea. Unemployed people are statistically more likely than average to have a mental health problem, and CBT can be pretty effective.

But there are at least 5 reasons why this is a disastrous plan:

  • It feeds into the belief that people with physical health problems should get better…

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